Cicer arietinum in the Treatment of Small Renal Stones: a Double-Blind, Randomized and Placebo-Controlled Trial

Document Type: Original paper

Authors

1 Research Institute for Islamic and Complementary Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Department of Persian Medicine, School of Persian Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Department of Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

2 Department of Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Urology and Nephrology Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

3 Research Institute for Islamic and Complementary Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Department of Persian Medicine, School of Persian Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

4 Department of Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Department of Traditional Medicine, School of Traditional Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

5 Research Institute for Islamic and Complementary Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Department of Persian Pharmacy, School of Persian Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Background and objectives: Urolithiasis is a common urological disorder. Based on the Persian medicine literatures, Cicer arietinum has a potential to dissolve renal stones. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of Cicer arietinum in patients with renal stone.
Methods: The extract of C. arietinum seeds was spray dried. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 74 patients with 6-10 mm renal stones in ultrasonography. Patients were randomly assigned to take 330 mg of C. arietinum extract or placebo capsules three times a day for 30 days. Complete stone dissolution and the change in stone size during the trial was evaluated by ultrasonography. To assess the efficacy and safety of C. arietinum, blood and urine biochemical parameters were checked at baseline and after the intervention. Results: In the C. arietinum group, complete stone dissolution occurred in 9 (23.7%) patients and reduce in stone size was observed in 17 (44.7%) patients while no response to treatment was observed in placebo group. The mean stone size was reduced from 7.15 ± 1.34 mm to 4.28 ± 3.09 mm in the C. arietinum group (p<0.001) and was increased from 7.08 ± 1.09 mm to 7.15 ±1.09 mm in the placebo group (p=0.13). The changes of the stone size were significantly higher in the drug consumergroup(p˂0.001). The changes of the urinary volume and magnesium level were significantlyhigher in the treatmentgroup (P=0.04 and P=0.02, respectively). Conclusion: Cicer arietinum extract could be an effective and safe treatment option for patients with 6-10 mm renal stones.

Keywords


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